Which is more important to becoming a Professional Land Surveyor?

Which is more important to becoming a Professional Land Surveyor?

  • Work/Field Experience (57%, 28 Votes)
  • College Education/Degree (43%, 21 Votes)

Total Voters: 49

Loading ... Loading ...

Profile photo of EricColburn

Eric D. Colburn, PLS, "The Geo-Business Innovator", helps geo-professionals improve through innovative solutions, mastery of marketing and business growth strategies, and coaching/training. Eric is a successful, serial entrepreneur, podcaster, industry writer, product development consultant, and RI licensed professional land surveyor.

Posted in Associate Membership, Land Surveying, Surveys Tagged with: , , , , ,
2 comments on “Which is more important to becoming a Professional Land Surveyor?
  1. Profile photo of JEFLS says:

    Eric,
    Although I voted for the work / field experience, I think that a mix of 60% work and 40% education would be a better expression of my opinion.
    For boundary determination, there is no substitute for field work. One cannot determine where the boundaries are without looking at the evidence, and passing along to the newbies what constitutes evidence. Once the evidence has been collected, then one must be able to solve the mathematical relationships for comparisons.
    For geomatics, there isn’t much point to anything other than education. As long as the field and office technicians can press the buttons, it has to be right because “thats what the “models” say is correct”.

  2. Profile photo of admin admin says:

    I have to agree with you. While the survey is geared to answer one or the other, to spark discussion, in my opinion, too, there has to be a good mix of both field and education.

    Should it be 50/50, or 60/40 as you suggest, or something else? I think that with the right mentor, 80% field and 20% education would be at the upper limit, favoring field experience. Your assessment of the need for good field experience to learn boundary determinations is right on the money.

    I don’t think proper boundary determinations can be made if you only have education, without proper field training.