Professional Land Surveyor Survey Party: A Few Land Surveying Pictures From The Field

This Professional Land Surveyor Survey Party is brought to you by EricColburn.com - Professional Land Surveyor Source - showing a few pictures I snapped while carrying out land surveying field work somewhat recently.

Most of these pictures were taken within the last few weeks, which you might be able to tell by the snow and/or stark cold looking locales, but a couple are from a few months ago when the climate was a little warmer (and greener). Right after the most recent pictures were taken we got hit with that blizzard most of you along the eastern seaboard got hit with too, getting 18-20 inches of snow. The good news is that today, most of that snow is gone!

GPS Base Station

GPS Base Station

GPS Base Station-Did I Mention It's in a Cemetery

Did I Mention It's In A Cemetery

NGS Control Disk Chepachet 1968

NGS Control Disk Chepachet 1968

GPS Rover Station

GPS Rover Station

Leica Robotic Total Station-Mr. Roboto

Leica Robotic Total Station-Mr. Roboto

Mr. Roboto Waiting to Locate Flag Pole

Mr. Roboto Waiting to Locate Flag Pole

Surveying in a Mill Alley

Surveying in a Mill Alley

Surveying Smoke Stack in a Mill Alley

Surveying Smoke Stack in a Mill Alley

Found This Boulder While Surveying

Found This Boulder While Surveying

They Paved over the Granite Bound!

They Paved over the Granite Bound!

A Granite Bound Over 12" Square

A Granite Bound Over 12" Square

Surveying A Water Tower

Surveying A Water Tower

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Eric D. Colburn, PLS, "The Geo-Business Innovator", helps geo-professionals improve through innovative solutions, mastery of marketing and business growth strategies, and coaching/training. Eric is a successful, serial entrepreneur, podcaster, industry writer, product development consultant, and RI licensed professional land surveyor.

Posted in Associate Membership, Land Surveying, Land Surveying Equipment, Leica, Pictures Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
2 comments on “Professional Land Surveyor Survey Party: A Few Land Surveying Pictures From The Field
  1. Joshua Puccio says:

    I am a survey crew chief. The company that I work for, is thinking about getting a robotic total station. We have operated with two full-time 2 person crews up until January 2009. Since then my 2 person crew has been handling all the work. Now we are losing my rodman. Instead of hiring another rodman, they might buy a robotic total station. The reservations are whether or not the robot will work in the woods, ie. topography and or wetland flags. Can you give me any helpful info, etc.

  2. Profile photo of EricColburn EricColburn says:

    Hi Joshua,

    Obviously, using a robotic total station works best in wide open spaces, but I’ve used it successfully for topography and wetland locations in wooded areas. However, I’ve found that in those two situations, it can be frustrating at times (even high-traffic areas can be frustrating once in awhile).

    The key is to develop techniques specific to those types of work. For instance, clear as much of the underbrush as you can closest to the instrument. A leaf or branch 10′ away from the instrument will cause more trouble than one 100′ away. You’ll also find that you may need to cut out a little more line, so if you can cut one line roughly parallel to the wetlands edge, then you can locate the flags from that line using offsets. This really isn’t so different regardless of how many people are on the crew or the equipment used. Working by yourself just means you want to limit the amount of wasted time it may take to go back to the instrument to clear something out of the way.

    Also, with larger tracts of land, you have to plan for starting and ending your day to minimize getting the equipment in and out. A good quality backpack is critical too.

    With that said, I think that the efficiencies found in using robotics elsewhere more than makes up for any “slowness” from working in thicker woods and underbrush. Once cut out and setup well, you’ll also find that traverses go pretty fast. And, unfortunately, when you factor in the reduced labor costs, switching to robotics and one person field crew (is it a crew then?) makes it very attractive, too.